Final Study Guide and Essay Revisions

I will not be on campus Friday, June 14

Final Study Guide

The final is scheduled for Monday, June 17, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. in our regular classroom. The final study guide is attached. Whatever will end up on the final itself will come directly from the study guide. There will be no changes except to clarify or correct what is there already. When it comes to the test itself, you will not be allowed to use your books or notes. You will work entirely from memory. With regard to the two essay prompts, the best way to prepare for those is to write draft essays. Be sure to bring something to write on and write with. I made a correction to the final directions for the passage identification and explanation part.

Revision Requirements

  1. Revisions are due at the time of our final exam, which is noted above. This is also the last time that late submissions will be accepted.
  2. I'll be happy to answer any questions regarding comments you can't read because of my handwriting at any time, but substantive questions will not be accepted until after noon, Friday, June 14.
  3. Any literature review receiving less than a C/2.0, that is a C-/1.7/71, C-/D+/1.5/69 or a D+/1.3/64 MUST be revised. If the literature review received a C/2.0/74 then revision is optional, but both encouraged and advised.
  4. Literature review revisions must be submitted with the annotated secondary source and the commented upon graded draft
  5. All revisions must be highlighted on the new draft. Merely correction grammar, punctuation, spelling and the like does not constitute a revision, and the essay will be not accepted as such. The grade will not change if that happens.

Journal Nine: The End is Near

For your final journal, I'd like you to reflect on the readings that we encountered over the course of the quarter. You may recall that we briefly went over the course's learning outcomes (which can be found attached to the syllabus). Those outcomes are posted just below. For this journal, I'd like you to write about the three outcomes you think are likely to stick with you for the long haul. For each of those, provide a specific example to illustrate why that is the case. For instance, the first outcome is about increasing your understanding, appreciation and enjoyment of American literature. If you write about this, describe how this came to be, what readings or coursework helped make this happen, and why you think it will remain with you. As always, respond to at least two other journals and to at least one response to your journal.

  1. To increase your understanding, appreciation, and enjoyment of literature in general and early American Literature in particular;
  2. Use the language and techniques of literary criticism when analyzing early American literature;
  3. Develop an appreciation of the skill and creativity of diverse authors of early American literature;
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of the history and development of American literature from the roughly 1400 to 1865 through historical, social, cultural, sexual and gendered contexts;
  5. Draw justifiable inferences about other races and/or cultures without stereotyping or use of ethnocentric bias through the study of diverse authors of early British literature;
  6. Develop awareness of the implications of race and/or culture when looking at moral problems and societal conflicts between pre-Colombian and antebellum eras in American as projected through early American Literature;
  7. Develop knowledge and understanding of America primarily, along with some of England, France, Canada and perhaps Africa as a culturally diverse societies as expressed through early American literature;
  8. Develop knowledge and understanding of other expressions of diversity such as class, gender, and/or religion in/through early American literature;
  9. Listen to and understand individuals and respond respectfully to their points of view;
  10. Enjoy reading and learning about the various incarnations of early American Literature and early America.

Journal Eight: A New Aesethetic

With Melville, Davis and Whitman, we have moved completely away from the rigidly didactic works, those meant to teach in a direct manner, to those that put a premium on education through entertainment and some engagement with an aesthetic experience. Compare the work of this week's writers to some of the earlier, more didactic works, that we have read. How does their teaching differ? How might it be the same? See what you can find in this regard. Illustrate your examination with passages from Melville, Davis and Whitman, along with the earlier writers you choose to work with (one for each comparative example). Same deadlines as always, for the journal itself and responses to at least two other journals and to at least one response to your journal.

Journal Seven: Mimesis

This week's readings have taken us from the realm of the primarily didactic to the primarily aesthetic, where literature is expected to entertain as much, maybe even more, than to instruct. In short, they fall more into the realm of art. One thing that is happening with these artistic works is the notion of Mimesis. This is Greek for "imitation," and generally taken to indicate works of literature that imitate characters on a human level, where correspondence to the physical world is understood as a model for beauty, truth and what is good. In this respect, it is the representation of nature (not as in the woods and the trees, but the world around us).

For this week's journal, write about how what these readings tell us about the world around us, what they reveal about beauty, truth and what is good. Touch on each of these three points and illustrate each with a passage or two from the assigned readings. Have these posted by midnight Monday.

As always, be sure to respond to at least two other journals and to one response to your journal by midnight Wednesday.

Journal Six: Transcendence

The assigned writings by Fuller could be described as being "hortatory." Take this to mean "exhort," as in encouraging a certain course of thought or action by the reader. Tie the exhortations of Fuller to the notions put forward by Emerson and Thoreau. Tie one of her exhortations to something similar, or wholly opposite, propounded by Emerson or Thoreau writers. Look at how the male view either contradicts or compliments the female view and write about why it may or may not matter to today's reader. In doing this, provide passages from the assigned readings as evidence in support of your thinking.

Post your journals by midnight Monday. As always, respond to at least two journals and to at least one response to your journals before Wednesday.

Journal Five: On Being Revolutionary

With this weeks' readings from Thomas Paine and Thomas Jefferson, we encounter some of the most influential propaganda written for the cause of the American Revolution. We also encounter a bit more, with Franklin and Foster's critiques of life in America. Based on what we've read, what would this week's writers think of today's America? would they appreciate the nation and people we have become? Be disappointed? have some mixed emotions? For the assigned readings, answer this question, what would Franklin, Paine, Jefferson or Foster think of the nation and people we have become? In answering this, provide passages from the assigned readings as evidence in support of your thinking.

Post your journals by midnight Monday. As always, respond to at least two journals and to at least one response to your journals before Wednesday.

Journal Four: Different Didacticisms

Knight represents something of a departure from the earlier Puritan writers. Though heavily influenced by the Puritans who came before, she is also expressing a good deal of intellectual independence. For this journal, compare the didacticism of Knight, Mather and Rowlandson. Find some idea where each aligns with what the earlier writers were seeking to teach. Describe how likely you think each of their intended audiences (Knight's audience is likely her daughter and maybe close acquaintances) is likely to actually learn and embrace the particular lesson and why that may or may not matter. Be sure to illustrate your discussion with passages from this week's writers and the earlier writers as well.

As always, once you have posted your journal, respond to at least two other journals and to at least one response to your journal. Deadline for journals is midnight Tuesday and responses is midnight Thursday.

No Monday Class

I'm home sick today. See you tomorrow.

Journal Three: Through Puritan Eyes

This week's writers were all about Puritanism in one way or another. Because many of the early settlers were Puritans, and they left a substantial record of their experiences and thoughts, many people argue that America was founded as a "Christian" nation. Whether or not America is a Christian nation, the Puritans left a clear imprint upon our nation. Describe how you see the readings from this past week as exhibiting thoughts and ideas that remain with us today, looking at why those thoughts and ideas are of interest or importance to contemporary Americans.

In developing your thoughts, illustrate each point with specific examples and cited passages from at least three of the readings. Having posted your journal, respond to at least two other journals and to one response to your journal. Journals should be posted no later than midnight Monday and responded to no later than midnight Thursday.

Journal Two: Seeing the New World through the lens of the Old

For this week's journal, write about what the various world views each of the explorers/colonizers tell us about them and the world they inhabit and explore. How might the cultural "baggage" they bring with them color the way they see and describe what they encounter? How might being aware of this baggage color the way we read and come to understand both their writings and what it is they encounter?

In developing your thoughts, illustrate each point with specific examples and cited passages from the at least three of the readings. Feel free to use Columbus from last week as well as what we read this week. Having posted your journal, respond to at least two other journals and to one response to your journal. Journals should be posted no later than midnight Monday and responded to no later than midnight Thursday.

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